Silene vulgaris (Moench) Garcke  
Family: Caryophyllaceae
bladder-campion, maiden's-tears
[Oberna commutata (Guss.) Ikonn., Silene cucubalus Wibel, Silene inflata (Salisb.) Sm.]
Silene vulgaris image
Merel R. Black  
Etymology: Silene: probably from Greek sialon, "saliva," referring to gummy exudation on stems, and/or named for Silenus, intoxicated foster-father of Bacchus (god of wine) who was covered with foam, much like the glandular secretions of many species of this genus.
Plants: erect, perennial, 8"-32" tall, robust, mostly smooth forb
Leaves: mostly only on the stem, often clasping
Flowers: white, 5-parted, 3/4"-1" wide, stalked, 3 styles; sepals tubular, rounded at the base, inflated in time, papery, hairless with pinkish lines; petals deeply 2-lobed; inflorescence open, with many flowers and branches; blooms June-Oct.
Habitat: disturbed sites
Hazardous: Careful, this plant is hazardous!
Conservation Status: Introduced - naturalized; potentially invasive
Silene vulgaris image
Robert W. Freckmann  
Silene vulgaris image
Merel R. Black  
Silene vulgaris image
Margery Melgaard  
Silene vulgaris image
Kenneth J. Sytsma  
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